Archive for the ‘organ donation’ Category

Giving it all away…

Give What?

                I met the Gibson family seven years ago in 2004. I had absolutely no idea whatsoever that this family, including their sick little boy Xavier, would impact my life, reinforcing certain future actions which up to this point had been completely ignored. Xavier was born with a severe heart condition which ultimately led to him desperately needing a heart transplant. During this same time frame, we connected with the Gibson family through a local charitable support group, CHD Families. Our previous experiences with Congenital Heart Defects (CHD’s) and our own child, led my wife and I to be a part of this support group. This connection kindled a flame of desire to help the Gibson Family, but how do you help a family with such a need, both emotionally and financially? We didn’t have much money and we weren’t real efficient with our time management so time always has and still does run thin, but again, how could we possibly help?

                I took a small first step by reaching out to the Gibson family, letting them know that we were there for them and if we could help in any way, shape or form, to please let us know. These types of calls and offers often deluge loved ones when tragedy occurs, but I meant it. Our only option now was to wait and listen. A much anticipated call came in for the Gibson family; a gift of life had been given as Xavier’s new heart had been procured. This call revealed another need as the family had traveled to Saint Louis, Missouri so that Xavier could go through heart transplant surgery.  This trip to Saint Louis provided an opportunity to help as the family would have to leave behind their home, their friends and the rest of their families so they could be with Xavier during this time frame.The family organized a massive multi-family (I think it was more multi-city to be honest with you) garage sale. We made the decision to contact family and friends to help assist the Gibson’s, collecting over two SUV’s full of used goods which went towards supporting the family’s financial needs while Xavier was hospitalized in Saint Louis recovering from his heart transplant.

Xavier

                This family taught me so much more through their hope and courage in the days leading up to and after their son’s heart transplant. This little boy’s family fostered a desire to embrace and actively promote organ donation, making this topic their calling, ensuring that people are empowered with the knowledge and awareness of donating the organs of their own body and/or those of loved ones who have passed away. In the midst of their own tragedy, they were trying to help others avoid this very same thing.  Xavier was very sick by the time a donor heart became available and the thought will always be there that if he had received one sooner, he might still be alive today. The Gibson family will never know the answer to their question, but everyone can help. We can all play our part and ensure that organ donation is something we have taken into consideration and make a firm commitment to. Xavier was ultimately too sick and did not survive through the recovery process of the transplant, but his mother and father, along with other family members, will carry on his legacy through their lives and the act of organ donation. Will you join this family in making a decision regarding organ donation?

It’s My Turn

                The doctors and nurses were buzzing in and out of the hospital room after my mother had passed away. She had been dead for several hours. Her body was cold and all signs of life had withered away, much like a dying flower in a field or a plant which has suffered the consequences of dehydration. A member of the medical staff would present me with a question which initially hit me as a mere cold and uncalculated approach to the topic, but nevertheless, a topic which needed approached. I could hear footsteps in the hospital hall as a doctor hesitantly approached our hospital room and lightly rapped his knuckles against the cherry stained door which was already partially opened.

 Knock, knock, knock.

     The door hinges breathed out a light squeal as the force of the knock slowly pushed the door open even further. The small ray of flourescent light which previously lined the wall slowly widened, providing more light to the dimly lit room. His voice was quiet which engaged my concentration as I tried to focus on what he was saying and then he asked me about the concept of organ donation. He asked me if I was willing to donate any of my mother’s organs. I shrugged the doctor’s question off at first needing some time to filter through this barrage of emotions which were consuming me. I mean, this seemed absurd to me at first, mostly due to her physical health, but several minutes later, I sought further explanation as to what exactly could be donated.  

                My mother and I never talked about organ donation. I immediately began fumbling through her purse, looking for a driver’s license or some other documentation in hopes that she may have indicated something…nothing. I thought if the license indicated such an action, I would be off the hook. I will share what was donated in just a few minutes which will bring these next few thoughts full circle. I thought about precious little Xavier as his picture and his family flashed through my thoughts. I thought about my mother-in-law, who had just received the gift of sight again through an act of organ donation. I thought about these people and wondered, how could I possibly keep this gift from someone? How selfish would that be? So without discussing it any further and without mentioning it to anyone except my father (they were divorced for 33 years so it was more of a reassurance conversation for my own purposes), I made the decision to donate everything possible. I mean, if the doctors can use my mother’s organs, bone and connective tissues for the benefit of another individual…Who am I to say no?

                I felt good after that, not good as in I had done something good, but good in that my mother would be able to help someone, even in her passing. The night proceeded on as time seemed to stand still, even though time is the one constant which always passes by at the same rate. I hesitantly departed the hospital around 10:30pm, approximately three hours after my mother passed away and 13 hours since I first arrived that very same day. I received a call from an organization called Midwest Transplant Network at which time I went through a grueling medical interview over the phone regarding my mother’s medical history. I was expecting the call and I knew it was coming…I just kept thinking and hoping that maybe it wouldn’t. My mind was everywhere except for that conversation. I repeatedly paced the halls of my mother’s apartment, room to room and back and forth, over and over, again and again. I apologized repeatedly for making the interviewer repeat multiple questions and even asking the person on the other end of the phone if we were done yet. I was losing my patience with this individual and I didn’t even know why. I even abruptly interrupted the interviewer to ask, “I’m really sorry, but are we almost done yet”? The interview/questionnaire went on for approximately 90 plus minutes and I was asked questions about my mother that no son should ever have to be asked, but I would surprisingly find out later on that this 90 minutes was actually time very well invested.

                You couldn’t tell the transplant medical team had removed a thing from my mother’s body at the funeral, unless you were me of course and/or you knew what you were looking for. The organs which had been donated were either covered up by her garments or replaced with replicas so you couldn’t notice any distinct or immediate differences by sight alone. I haven’t really given much thought about the donation since that very moment I actually made the commitment to donate her organs, but that changed recently when I received a packet in the mail from the Midwest Transplant Network. I would like to first share a poem which accompanied the donor letter and then I will share the impact of her donation following the poem.

To Remember Me – I will live forever

Robert N. Test

 

The day will come when my body will lie upon a white sheet neatly tucked under four corners of a mattress located in a hospital; busily occupied with the living and the dying. At a certain moment a doctor will determine that my brain has ceased to function and that, for all intents and purposes, my life has stopped. 

When that happens, do not attempt to instill artificial life into my body by the use of a machine. And don’t call this my deathbed. Let it be called the bed of life, and let my body be taken from it to help others lead fuller lives. 

Give my sight to the man who has never seen a sunrise, a baby’s face or love in the eyes of a woman. 

Give my heart to a person whose own heart has caused nothing but endless days of pain. 

Give my blood to the teenager who was pulled from the wreckage of his car, so that he might live to see his grandchildren play. 

Give my kidneys to the one who depends on a machine to exist from week to week. 

Take my bones, every muscle, every fiber and nerve in my body and find a way to make a crippled child walk. 

Explore every corner of my brain. 

Take my cells, if necessary, and let them grow so that, someday a speechless boy will shout at the crack of a bat and a deaf girl will hear the sound of rain against her window. 

Burn what is left of me and scatter the ashes to the winds to help the flowers grow. 

If you must bury something, let it be my faults, my weakness and all prejudice against my fellow man. 

Give my sins to the devil. 

Give my soul to God.

If, by chance, you wish to remember me, do it with a kind deed or word to someone who needs you. If you do all I have asked, I will live forever. 

Robert N. Test

The Impact

                On January 26th, 2011, my mother passed away from complications due to smoking related causes, COPD and an incident which took place when my mother tried smoking with her oxygen on. These are the major factors which heavily contributed to me, her only son, having to make this decision of gifting her organs at her young age of 57. Three weeks later, I received a packet in the mail which contained a letter from the Midwest Transplant Network. This letter disclosed the recovery of my mother’s tissues and organs. They were as follows;

     They were able to recover bone and connective tissues which are going to be transplanted into injured transplant patients who need surgery to heal. These procedures can include orthopedic, neurosurgical and reconstructive applications.

                The bone grafts they recovered are used to replace diseased bone in individuals suffering from bone cancer. As many as 50 people may benefit from this gift. My mother would have liked this as cancer took the lives of both of her parents.

     Here is the important part to me that really hit home and this was one of my main reasons for gifting my mother’s corneas. I watched and stood by helplessly as my mother-in-law began losing her eyesight through a hereditary condition of the eyes which progressively deteriorates her eyesight. She received a transplanted cornea which has allowed her to partially see again, but she has one more cornea transplant to go. How could I keep someone from experiencing such treasures as watching their grandchildren grow old? How could I sit back and allow someone to watch the love of their life for the last 50 years slowly fade away in the haze of their own eyesight. I couldn’t and I didn’t.

     My mother’s corneas were successfully transplanted into a 61 year old male and a 60 year old female, both on the East coast. Both of these individuals were given the gift of sight.

     Please consider donation, both for you and your family members. Make the decision easier by indicating your wishes on the back of your driver’s license or indicate such in your will. You can give life in the midst of death. My mother’s options were limited due to her health condition, but I gave all that I could and I can only hope that for one person…that all was enough. So, will you join the Gibson Family in making a firm and committed decision regarding organ donation? Will you join me in making a decision regarding organ donation. Please…please….please…Join someone in this cause.

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