Posts Tagged ‘life’

Cooper gets his way with Grandpa!!!

          So every once in a while, I thought I could share some of the crazy things my kids say and/or do from time to time, especially since I have three boys. If you dare follow these posts over the lifetime of my children, I am almost certain you will be left praying and begging for a little girl, especially once my three Martians (maybe four if you include me) are full-grown and off on their own. I’m sure the accumulation of their stories will haunt you into wanting to purchase that vibrant pink Barbie mansion with the letter jacket Ken doll. OK, maybe not any of the above, but I hope it puts a smile on your face and one on theirs as they read this sometime in the distant future 

           I wish I would have done this more with Blake as his creative mind concocted and still does concoct some of the most outlandish sayings, producing classical comedic moments which left/leave us gasping for our breath on numerous occasions. I have a few of them which I will share in a later post, but for now, let’s check out some of our middle boy’s moments, also known as Cooperism’s. These are obviously much funnier to us when they happen in real-time and in person, but I wanted to start capturing some of these moments so we can share them with our boys later on in life and of course show them to their girlfriends when they are teenagers.

Cooperism #1

          Cooper’s Grandma and Grandpa Harris (my dad and step-mom) stopped in for a quick visit to look at an idea I had. My step-mom was going to look into finishing a project for me that my late mother had started and we wanted to take a look at it together. Cooper went missing in action as he sometimes does which usually means he is either hiding somewhere very discreet where no one would find him anyways or he is far away in some make-believe world which was created by none other than Cooper himself. OK, OK, he is typically down in the playroom playing make-believe something.  Even apart from these two activities, there are several rooms which could occupy his time, but it became very clear as to where he was when we heard the echoing sound reverberating from the restroom walls. Cooper made it to the restroom without telling a soul and then the echoing sounds bellowed from the wide open restroom door which Cooper purposefully left to ensure someone would hear him once he finally yelled for help. The time came and an unexpected request sailed past Cooper’s lips traveling from the restroom to the kitchen, falling upon deaf ears at first. “Danpah!” Cooper yelled. The joint interactive discussion we were engaged in muffled his first attempt and everyone seemingly shrugged it off. “DAAANPAAAH!!!” Cooper yelled. My wife looked at my dad and said, “I think he wants you”. My dad quickly responded, “Yes son”. “I went doop danpa”, Cooper replied in the most serious manner. We chuckled as my wife and I knew what was coming next. Grandpa Harris hesitantly glanced at us with a, what am I supposed to do or say to that look. Cooper was growing impatient by this point. “Danpa, I WENT DOOP!”, he uttered again with restlessness getting the better part of him. My wife looked around at all of us and said that Cooper wanted Grandpa Harris to wipe his bottom. My dad started walking towards the restroom, briefly looking back at us before resuming his slow pace down the rest of the hallway. Grandpa Harris peered around the corner and into the restroom as uncertainty overcame him.Cooper had indeed gone “doop” (Cooper’s pronunciation) and Grandpa said, “Good job buddy!”, still trying to avoid the impending outcome. My wife was correct the entire time. She knew Cooper was luring grandpa down the hallway and into the restroom so someone and that someone being grandpa, could wipe his bottom. And yes, Grandpa Harris wiped Cooper’s bottom.

Cooperism #2

                Cooper was at his Grandma Coulter’s house and decided to take his shirt off. He ran around most of the day refusing to put his shirt back on and when grandma thought he might be getting cold, she pleaded with Cooper to put the missing garment back on. Cooper wouldn’t budge though. At first he claimed he was hot; however, this excuse went to the wayside before long. The temperature outside was freezing, but inside it was bearable, as long as you had some clothing on. It was only a matter of time before his little lips started shivering and his teeth commenced to chattering, but Cooper held his ground. Grandma asked Cooper once again to put his shirt back on at which time he revealed the real reason behind his attempt at manliness in the midst of a cold house. Cooper informed his grandma that his dad was a worker and never wore his shirt in the house so Cooper said he was a worker too and didn’t need to wear a shirt either. What else is this kid going to pick up from me?

Cooperism #3

                It was getting close to Cooper’s bedtime and out of nowhere Cooper started saying his stomach hurt. My wife and I looked at each other with skepticism written all over our faces as we thought this must be some conniving ploy to avoid bedtime. Cooper said it a few more times in his little high-pitched voice while placing both hands over his stomach, “My tummy hurt”. His eyes gave a brief look of desperation as his tone and volume changed very quickly. His next line gave every indication as to why his stomach was hurting, “OH MY DOSH, I HAVE TO DOE TO DA WESTROOM! OH MY DOSH!” He briefly placed his hands over his private area and then moved them quickly to hold his bottom. Knowing that Cooper waits till the last-minute anyways, we loudly encouraged him to “GO AND GO NOW” and then he rushed down the hallway in a valiant effort to make it to the toilet.

What are some of your children’s Ism’s that have touched your heart?

Are you capturing these moments to share with your children down the road?

P.S. Cooper did indeed make it to the restroom, just in case you were wondering.

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“If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good, and the very gentle, and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too, but there will be no special hurry.”

Ernest Hemingway

Introduction

          Some people will look at a name and think nothing of it. There may be a brief comment or thought as to the social status of the name, but beyond that, not much thought is given. There are parents who carelessly name their children almost as randomly as the next drawing of pick five lottery numbers, while others embed deep, spiritual meaning into the names of their offspring. Have you ever asked someone why they bestowed a certain name upon their child or children? I bet this question alone would draw some very interesting and colorful dialogue.

          There are other people who look at a name and they want to know why. There is an element of intrigue and inquisitiveness which grasps their inner soul and they manifest an extreme thirst for knowledge which can only be quenched by the answer. OK, OK, maybe this is a bit too dramatized, but I think you get the point. Corporate America believes that names are important to you as they spend billions of dollars on marketing and promotion to develop “name” brands and household “names”. Do you know who Thomas Mapother IV is? You should Google it because this person thought they needed to drop their last name in order to achieve notoriety.

          I don’t really care which one you are because I’m going to tell you either way, like it or not. I’m just kidding here, but I do believe it is important for me to disclose my reasoning behind the name BrokenTogether before going any further in my blog. This post shares the insight behind the name; however, it does not go into the specific details of why I was broken. I will now share with you what Brokentogether is and what the name means to me.

BrokenTogether Defined

(Courtesy of http://www.dictionary.com)

broken

[broh-kuh n]

–verb

1.   pp. of break.

–adjective

2.   Reduced to fragments; fragmented.

3.   Ruptured; torn; fractured.

4.   Not functioning properly; out of working order.

7.  Fragmentary or incomplete

8. Infringed or violated 

9. Interrupted, disrupted, or disconnected

10. Weakened in strength, spirit, etc.: His broken health was due to alcoholism.

11. Tamed, trained, or reduced to submission

12. Imperfectly spoken, as language

13. Spoken in a halting or fragmentary manner, as under emotional strain

14. Disunited or divided

15. Not smooth; rough or irregular

16. Ruined; bankrupt 

together

[tuhgeth-er]

–adverb

1.   Into or in one gathering, company, mass, place, or body 

2.   Into or in union, proximity, contact, or collision, as two or more things

3.   Into or in relationship, association, business, or agreement, etc.

4.   Taken or considered collectively or conjointly

5.   (of a single thing) into or in a condition of unity, compactness, or coherence

6.    at the same time; simultaneously

7.   Without intermission or interruption; continuously; uninterruptedly

8.   In cooperation; with united action; conjointly

9.   With mutual action; mutually; reciprocally

–adjective

10.       Slang . mentally and emotionally stable and well-organized

Brokentogether

[broh-kuh n-tuh-geth-er]

-noun

1. Slang, Me

adjective

2. Generally relating to an individual who has been broken mentally, physically or spiritually, but through some sort of restorative process, is in a literal sense restored to their original state prior to being broken; generally related to the Christian religion and the message of salvation through Jesus Christ.

BrokenTogether Explained

          Broken can be anything. It can be as little as one experience or a collection of experiences. Brokenness can be induced and initiated by fear or immersed in the passions of the pleasure principle. This state of brokenness can be mentally, physically or spiritually, and experienced as your passing through the innocence of childhood or gauging the world from your front porch as an aging adult. Pain is relative to the individual which means that our greatest personal pain is equal to that of another person’s greatest pain, regardless of the specific event. We can only feel or relate to the pain we have experienced. Just as Hemingway stated, some will break easier than others, he indicated a threshold which also indicates a relative nature to what I am calling brokenness. Brokenness can manifest itself in many ways. The pathology of brokenness can be traced back to many of the following traumas; physical abuse, child abuse, bullying, sexual abuse, drug, gambling and alcohol addiction (often preceded by a previous state of brokenness), pornography, divorce, infidelity, health (mental and physical) and many other specific traumas which are too many to account for all of them here. These traumas are things which break our spirit and can often lead to the following; cutting, lack of self-worth, suicidal ideation and attempts, suicide, guilt, shame, physical harm, incarceration, loss of family and friends, addictions (new and continued), separation from God and many other courses of destructive, abnormal and maladaptive behavior. Broken is the hurt, Broken is pain.

          It is my belief that we are all broken to begin with. This is due to the corrupt nature of man and his inability to fix him or herself. With that being said, together means the pieces have been collected up, sorted out and we are in the process of being put back in order.  We don’t look or act the same as we did before. Our lives have been changed, but it wasn’t our broken state that put us back together. A truly broken thing never fixes itself. The broken thing needs intervention. Broken things do not fix other broken things either. They only lend to the company of brokenness which gives the perception of normality. This is also why misery loves company; People just want to feel normal and accepted. There is only one who is worthy of fixing the broken and only true restoration and acceptance comes from Him and that is God. Together is the healing, together is hope.

Q: So what exactly is Brokentogether?

A: Brokentogether is me; Brokentogether is YOU!

Let us all be strong in and at the broken places!!!

If you would, share with us what is in a name to you. It could be anything; your name, your child’s name or any other name that you draw meaning from.